Seeeduino LoRaWAN

Introduction

Seeeduino LoRaWAN is an Arduino development board with LoRaWan protocol embedded, through which you can get started quickly to experience LoRa’s advantage in the field of IoT. Based on the communication module RHF76-052AM, Seeeduino LoRaWAN is compatible with LoRaWAN Class A/C and supports a variety of communication frequencies.

The 4 onboard standard Grove connectors allow Seeeduino LoRaWan to connect with hundreds of Grove sensors and actuators from Seeedstudio conveniently, as a result, users are able to be more focus on the application itself without worrying about the compatibility issue between different modules. In addition, the board has embedded an integrated lithium battery management chip that allows the board to be charged by USB interface. In low consumption mode, a full charged lithium battery can power the board for several months.

If you want to build an IoT application quickly, Seeeduino LoRaWAN is your best choice.

Product Version Released Date How to Buy
Seeeduino LoRaWAN Dec 20, 2016
Seeeduino LoRaWAN W/GPS Dec 20, 2016

Warning

Please update the firmware when the first time to use it.

Tip

Seeeduino LoRaWAN W/GPS is consist of GPS module.

Features

  • Minimum current (3.7V lipo battery) - 2mA
  • Minimum current (3.7V lipo battery & remove PWR LED) - 80 uA

Arduino/Processor

  • ATSAMD21G18 @ 48MHz with 3.3V logic/power
  • Arduino compatible (based on Arduino Zero bootloader)
  • Embedded with lithium battery management chip and status indicator led
  • 20 GPIOs
  • 4 on-board Grove connectors
  • 18 x PWM pins
  • 6 x analog inputs
  • 1 x analog output (A0)
  • 3.3V regulator with 200mA output
  • Reset button

LoRaWAN/RHF76-052

  • 1.45uA sleep current in WOR mode (Spec of the modules, not the board)
  • High link budget of 160dB. -140dBm sensitivity and 19dBm Output power.
  • Dual band, 434/470MHz and 868/915MHz
    • 19dBm@434MHz/470MHz
    • 14dBm@868MHz/915MHz
  • Support LoRaWAN protocol, Class A/C
  • Ultra long range communication
  • Ultra low power consumption
  • Firmware upgrade
  • Small size: 23mm X 28mm with 33 pin SMT package

Warning

Unlike most Arduino & Genuino boards, the Zero runs at 3.3V. The maximum voltage that the I/O pins can tolerate is 3.3V. Applying voltages higher than 3.3V to any I/O pin could damage the board.

Specification

Item Value
Microcontroller ATSAMD21G18, 32-Bit ARM Cortex M0+
Operating Voltage 3.3V
Digital I/O Pins 20
PWM Pins All but pins 2 and 7
UART 2 (Native and Programming)
Analog Input Pins 6, 12-bit ADC channels
Analog Output Pins 1, 10-bit DAC
External Interrupts All pins except pin 4
DC Current per I/O Pin 7 mA
Flash Memory 256 KB
SRAM 32 KB
EEPROM None
Clock Speed 48 MHz
Lenght 68 mm
Width 53 mm
Weight 19.6g(without GPS), 19.9(with GPS)

Application Ideas

  • Internet of Things
  • Smart House
  • Security
  • Smart Grid
  • Intelligent Farm
  • Intelligent Park

Tip

Use Grove modules to expand your application

There are 4 Grove connects on board. If this is your first time to hear about Grove, please put had on Grove System for more details. In brief, Groves is hundreds of sensor that in standard style, which is consist of sensors, actuators, displays as well as communication.

Hardware Overview

  • 1. Micro USB - Programming and supply power to the board
  • 2. Grove connectors
  • 3. JST2.0 Lipo battery input (3.7V) and charge status led
  • 4. DFU Button - Firmware mode button
  • 5. Reset Button
  • 6. Arduino Pinout
  • 7. ICSP pins
  • 8. Firmware mode led
  • 9. Wire antenna
  • A. uFL antenna
  • B. RF module - RHF76-052AM
  • C. ARM Cortex M0 processor - ATSAMD21G18
  • D. LEDs
    • RX/TX - blink when data on UART(from/to USB)
    • L - an led connect to D13
    • PWR - power

Tip

If you want to use the 4 on-board Grove connector, please use digitalWrite(38, HIGH) to open VCC. Otherwise you can’t provide power to Grove modules.

Pin Map

Pin Name GPIO Num External Interrupt PWM Analog In Analog Out Function
0 #0 YES YES RX(Serial)
1 #1 YES YES TX(Serial)
2 #2 YES
3 #3 YES YES
4 #4 YES
5 #5 YES YES
6 #6 YES YES
7 #7 YES
8 #8 YES YES
9 #9 YES YES
10 #10 YES YES
11 #11 YES YES SPI_MOSI
12 #12 YES YES SPI_MISO
13 #13 YES YES SPI_SCK
SDA #20 YES YES
SCL #21 YES YES
A0 #A0 YES YES YES YES
A1 #A1 YES YES YES
A2 #A2 YES YES YES
A3 #A3 YES YES YES
A4 #A4 YES YES YES Voltage of Battery
A5 #A5 YES YES YES Charge Status

Note

All pins can act as Digital Input and Output

Getting Started - Arduino IDE

Note

This chapter is based on Win10 and Arduino IDE v1.6.0

First you need to install the latest Arduino IDE, and ADD Seeeduino LoRa to your Arduino IDE.

Install the Driver (For Windows)

When the first time to insert the board, you should get a USB COM device name Seeeduino LoRaWAN that need to install a driver. Click on the below button to download driver for the board.

To make sure the driver was installed successful, open your Device Manager to see if Seeeduino LoRaWAN exists.

Now we can upload our first demo - Blink to Seeeduino LoRaWAN.

Open your Arduino IDE and click on File > Examples > 01.Basics > Blink to open the sketch or copy the blow code:

// the setup function runs once when you press reset or power the board
void setup() {
  // initialize digital pin 13 as an output.
  pinMode(13, OUTPUT);
}

// the loop function runs over and over again forever
void loop() {
  digitalWrite(13, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
  delay(1000);              // wait for a second
  digitalWrite(13, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
  delay(1000);              // wait for a second
}

And Then,

  • Click on Tools > Board > Seeeduino LoRaWAN
  • Click on Tools > Port to select a right port number. (Don’t choose COM1)

Then click on the Upload button on the left-top of Arduino IDE, seconds later the sketch was uploaded successful.

If the uploading is success, you should the some info in red and please the on-board LED, it’s blinking.

Battery

You can power the board via a 3.7V Lipo battery. There’s a JST2.0 cable included, use it if you can’t get a battery with JST2.0 connector.

Warning

Make sure the positive and negative end of your battery is connected right, otherwise the board may be damaged.

Charge status pin and positive pin of the battery had beed connect to A4 and A5, which allow you to detect the charge status and measure voltage of the battery via coding.

Copy and upload the below code to detect the battery status.

// battey of Seeeduino LoRaWAN

const int pin_battery_status  = A5;
const int pin_battery_voltage = A4;

void setup() {
    SerialUSB.begin(115200);
    pinMode(pin_battery_status, INPUT);
}

void loop() {

    int a = analogRead(pin_battery_voltage);
    float v = a/1023.0*3.3*11.0;        // there's an 1M and 100k resistor divider 
    SerialUSB.print(v, 2);
    SerialUSB.print('\t');
    SerialUSB.println(digitalRead(pin_battery_status));

    delay(1000);
}

Note

Charge status return 0 while charging, return 1 while charge done or no battery insert.

Send and Receive Example

There is a well written library for the LoRaWAN modules, for simple applications you even don’t need to know much about the protocol about LoRa, which is complex and hard to read. And please note that you till need some acknowledge about LoRa protocol if you want an advanced application. You don’t need to download the library, it’s included in the package already. You can open it at File > Examples > LoRaWAN.

You need 2 piece of Seeeduino LoRaWAN to complete this example, one for sending and another for receiving.

Sending

Open your Arduino IDE and click on File > Examples > LoRaWAN > p2p_tx to open the sketch or you can copy the code below. This sketch will broadcast a string “Hello World!” every 3000 ms.

// Seduino LoRaWAN - TX example 
#include <LoRaWan.h>

void setup(void)
{
    SerialUSB.begin(115200);
    lora.init();
    lora.initP2PMode(433, SF12, BW125, 8, 8, 20);
}

void loop(void)
{
    lora.transferPacketP2PMode("Hello World!");
    SerialUSB.println("Send string.");
    delay(3000);
}

Receiving

Open your Arduino IDe and click on File > Examples > LoRaWAN > p2p_rx to open the sketch or you can copy the code below.

// Seduino LoRaWAN - RX example
#include <LoRaWan.h>

unsigned char buffer[128] = {0, };

void setup(void)
{
    SerialUSB.begin(115200);
    lora.init();
    lora.initP2PMode(433, SF12, BW125, 8, 8, 20);
}

void loop(void)
{
    short length = 0;
    short rssi = 0;

    memset(buffer, 0, 128);
    length = lora.receivePacketP2PMode(buffer, 128,  &rssi, 1);

    if(length)
    {
        SerialUSB.print("Length is: ");
        SerialUSB.println(length);
        SerialUSB.print("RSSI is: ");
        SerialUSB.println(rssi);
        SerialUSB.print("Data is: ");
        for(unsigned char i = 0; i < length; i ++)
        {
            SerialUSB.print("0x");
            SerialUSB.print(buffer[i], HEX);
            SerialUSB.print(" ");
        }
        SerialUSB.println();
    }
}

After both of the sketch is well uploaded, open the serial monitor of the receiving board, check if you can get some data as below.

Note

There will be a gateway kit for LoRa soon, and we will add getting started about APB and OTAA mode at wiki of the kit.

Examples

We had provide many useful examples. You can open File > Examples > LoRaWan get more details. Those examples include:

  • ABP
  • OTAA
  • p2p-rx
  • p2p-tx

GPS Data

Note

This chapter works with Seeeduino LoRaWAN W/GPS only.

Copy below code you Seeeduino LoRaWAN W/GPS.

void setup()
{
    Serial.begin(9600);
    SerialUSB.begin(115200);
}

void loop()
{
    while(Serial.available())
    {
        SerialUSB.write(Serial.read());
    }
    while(SerialUSB.available())
    {
        Serial.write(SerialUSB.read());
    }
}

Open Serial Monitor then you will get data from GPS.

Low Power

The minimum current is 80uA(for Seeeduino LoRaWAN) under our testing. Please follow below steps.

  1. Remove PWR LED (If you don’t remove this LED, the current will > 2mA)
  2. Remove CHG LED
  3. Upload below code to your board.
#include <LoRaWan.h>
#include <EnergySaving.h>

EnergySaving nrgSave;

void blink()
{
    for(unsigned char i = 0; i < 5; i ++)
    {
        digitalWrite(13,HIGH);
        delay(500);
        digitalWrite(13,LOW);
        delay(500);
    }
}

void setup()
{
    for(unsigned char i = 0; i < 26; i ++)      // important, set all pins to HIGH to save power
    {
        pinMode(i, OUTPUT);
        digitalWrite(i, HIGH);
    }

    lora.init();
    blink();    
    lora.setDeviceLowPower();
    blink();    
    nrgSave.begin(WAKE_EXT_INTERRUPT, 7, dummy);    // buton on D7 to wake up the board
    nrgSave.standby();
}

void loop()
{
    blink();
    nrgSave.standby();
}

void dummy(void)
{
    // do something
}

// END File

Update firmware

The firmware version of is 2.0.10, if you want to update firmware, few steps need to follow.

If you want to check version of you board, please upload below code to your board.

void setup()
{
    Serial1.begin(9600);
    SerialUSB.begin(115200);
}

void loop()
{
    while(Serial1.available())
    {
        SerialUSB.write(Serial1.read());
    }
    while(SerialUSB.available())
    {
        Serial1.write(SerialUSB.read());
    }
}

Open your Serial Monitor and INPUT

AT+VER

Then you will get the version of your board.

Step1

Copy and upload below code to your board.

// Update firmware to RHF76-052AM
#include <Arduino.h>

void setup()
{
    SerialDBG.begin(115200);
    SerialUSB.begin(115200);
}

void loop()
{
    while(SerialDBG.available())
    {
        SerialUSB.write(SerialDBG.read());
    }
    while(SerialUSB.available())
    {
        SerialDBG.write(SerialUSB.read());
    }
}

Input AT+VER to get the version of your board. If it’s not the most recent version, please following below steps to upgrade it.

Step2

Remove the board form USB and reconnect again, then press the DFU Button, after the Firmware mode led blinking you can go to the next step.

Step3

Click to download the latest firmware, which is a .bin file.

Step4

Open PuTTy and connect to the board

Tip

You can find the latest PuTTy here: http://www.extraputty.com/download.php

Step5

After connect your board to PuTTy successful, you will find the char ‘C’ print on the monitor continually. Click on Files Transfer > Ymodem > Send, and select the .bin file we had downloaded at Step4.

Then the updating is started.

Resources

Help us make it better

Thank you for choosing Seeed. A couple of months ago we initiated a project to improve our documentation system. What you are looking at now is the first edition of the new documentation system. Comparing to the old one, here is the progresses that we made:

  • Replaced the old documentation system with a new one that was developed from Mkdocs, a more widely used and cooler tool to develop documentation system.
  • Integrated the documentation system with our official website, now you can go to Bazaar and other section like Forum and Community more conveniently.
  • Reviewed and rewrote documents for hundreds of products for the system’s first edition, and will continue migrate documents from old wiki to the new one.

An easy-to-use instruction is as important as the product itself. We are expecting this new system will improve your experience when using Seeed’s products. However since this is the first edition, there are still many things need to improve, if you have any suggestions or findings, you are most welcome to submit the amended version as our contributor or give us suggestions in the survey below, Please don’t forget to leave your email address so that we can reply.

Happy hacking