Grove - Fingerprint Sensor

Introduction

5.0V UART

The Finger Print Sensor is one optical fingerprint sensor which will make fingerprint detection and verification adding super simple.There’s a high powered DSP chip AS601 that does the image rendering, calculation, feature-finding and searching. You can also enroll new fingers directly - up to 162 finger prints can be stored in the onboard FLASH memory. There’s a red LED in the lens which will light up during taking photos so that you know its working condition. It is easy to use and by far the best fingerprint sensor you can get.

Specifications

  • Supply voltage: 3.6~6.0 V
  • Operating current(Max) : 120 mA
  • Fingerprint imaging time: 1.0 S
  • Match Mode: Compare Mode 1:1
  • Search Mode: 1:N
  • Storage capacity: 162 templates
  • False Acceptance Rate : 0.001% (Security level 3)
  • False Reject Rate :1.0% (Security level 3)
  • Baud rate :9600, 19200, 28800, 38400, 57600bps (default is 57600)
  • Interface:TTL Serial
  • Work Temperature:-20 ~ +50 ℃
  • Interface
Pin Number Name Type Function Description
1 Vin in Positive Power Supply Input Terminal(Line color:Red)
2 TD out Serial data output, TTL logic levels(Line color: Yellow)
3 RD in Serial data input, TTL logic levels(Line color: White)
4 GND - Signal ground(Line color: Black)

Platforms Supported

Getting Started

The Finger Print Sensor module is typically used in safes - there’s a high powered DSP chip that does the image rendering, calculation, feature-finding and searching. Connect to any microcontroller or system with TTL serial, and send packets of data to take photos, detect prints, hash and search. You can also enroll new fingers directly - up to 162 finger prints that can be stored in the onboard FLASH memory. There’s a red LED in the lens which will light up during taking photos so that you know its working condition.

  • Connect the Sensor to the Digital Port 2 of the Grove - Base Shield.
  • Plug the Grove - Base Shield into Arduino and connect Arduino to PC by using a USB cable.

When you plug in the power, you can see the red LED blink which indicates the sensor is working.

  • Download the Finger Print Sensor Library and Unzip it into the libraries file of Arduino IDE by the path: ..\arduino-1.0.1\libraries.

The library can enroll and search so its perfect for any project. It can help you get running in under 10 minutes. There are basically two requirements for using the optical fingerprint sensor. First one, you’ll need to enroll fingerprints - that means assigning ID #‘s to each print so you can query them later. Once you’ve enrolled all your prints, you can easily ‘search’ the sensor, asking it to identify which ID (if any) has currently been photographed.

  • Open the enroll code directly by the path: File->Example->FingerPrint->Enroll.
  • Upload the code into Arduino.
  • Start up Serial Tool and Select the ComNum and BaudRate used by the Arduino.
  • Select the “SendNew” option. Send the ID # you want to use. You can use up to 162 ID numbers. And it will ask you to press the finger to the sensor. At the moment, you should see the red LED blink.

  • If your press is OK, you could see the following message. You will then have to repeat the process, to get a second clean print. Use the same finger! On success you will see the message.

  • If there’s a problem such as a bad print or image, you’ll have to do it again.

Once you have the finger enrolled, it’s a good idea to do a quick test to make sure it can be found in the database.

  • Open the demo code:fingerprint and upload it.
  • When prompted, press a different/same finger to the sensor. If it is the same finger, you should get a match with the ID # as show below.

  • If it is not a finger in the database, This serial port will output nothing.

Tip

More details about Grove modules please refer to Grove System

Resources


ArduinoWioBeagleBoneRaspberry PiLinkIt ONE

Caution

The platforms mentioned above as supported is/are an indication of the module's hardware or theoritical compatibility. We only provide software library or code examples for Arduino platform in most cases. It is not possible to provide software library / demo code for all possible MCU platforms. Hence, users have to write their own software library.

Help us make it better

Thank you for choosing Seeed. A couple of months ago we initiated a project to improve our documentation system. What you are looking at now is the first edition of the new documentation system. Comparing to the old one, here is the progresses that we made:

  • Replaced the old documentation system with a new one that was developed from Mkdocs, a more widely used and cooler tool to develop documentation system.
  • Integrated the documentation system with our official website, now you can go to Bazaar and other section like Forum and Community more conveniently.
  • Reviewed and rewrote documents for hundreds of products for the system’s first edition, and will continue migrate documents from old wiki to the new one.

An easy-to-use instruction is as important as the product itself. We are expecting this new system will improve your experience when using Seeed’s products. However since this is the first edition, there are still many things need to improve, if you have any suggestions or findings, you are most welcome to submit the amended version as our contributor or give us suggestions in the survey below, Please don’t forget to leave your email address so that we can reply.

Happy hacking